Surfers Paradise

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Surfer's Paradise

Surfer

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Surfers Paradise International Raceway was a motor racing complex at Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. The circuit was designed and built by Keith Williams, a motor racing enthusiast. It was located opposite the Surfers Paradise Ski Gardens at Carrara[1]. The complex included a drag strip along the main straight, with a very fast right-hander under a Dunlop bridge leading to a tight corner that turned the track back to a medium-length straight. Then a fast-ish left hander before rushing into a series of rights and lefts that skirted the only hill on the property. A slow right that opened up brought the track back to the main straight. Within the circuit lay an airstrip and quarter-mile dirt speedway similar to the one that used to sit within the lower part of the Amaroo Park circuit. Drag racing commenced at Easter in 1966[2]. Keith Williams sold the raceway in 1984[1]. After years of neglect it was finally destroyed in 2003. The site has since been redeveloped as Emerald Lakes canal estate.[2][3]

Major races

With Lakeside well established as a Queensland’s round of the Tasman Series it was not until 1968 that the series visited Surfers Paradise. As typified the 1968 series Jim Clark (Lotus 49T) and Chris Amon (Ferrari 246) filled the top two positions with Clark’s team mate Graham Hill completing the podium. Formula 5000 Tasman Series rounds were also held at the circuit each year from 1970 to 1975.[4] The Australian Grand Prix visited just once, in 1975. In torrential rain Max Stewart took his Lola T400 Formula 5000 to victory from John Leffler, who was second on a day when the F5000′s were badly out-handled by Ray Winter driving his AF2 Brabham-based Mildren-Ford.

The circuit also played host to the several endurance races, most notably the Rothmans 12 Hour and was a regular round of the Australian Touring Car Championship throughout its life.

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Sandown

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Sandown Park

Sandown Park

Sandown International Raceway is a motor racing circuit in Melbourne, Victoria, approximately 25 kilometres (16 mi) south east of the city centre.

History

Sandown Racecourse was first built as a horse racing facility, dating back into the 19th century, but closed in the 1930s in a government run rationalisation program. Redevelopment began not long after World War II. A bitumen motor racing circuit was built around the outside of the proposed horse track (which was not completed until 1965) and was first opened in 1962 and held the race which became the Sandown 500 for the first time in 1964. This race was one of the ‘endurance’ races in the V8 Supercar calendar.

Motor racing

When Sandown first opened in 1962 it held the Sandown International Cup, which featured world-famous drivers such as Stirling Moss and Bruce McLaren. Throughout the 1960s and 70s the race meetings continued to attract international stars along with the best of Australia’s drivers.

Australia’s traditional Holden/Ford rivalry really surfaced at the track in the late 1960s and through the 1970s until Peter Brock won seven meetings in a row, out of a total of nine.

1984 saw the first appearance of Group A touring cars and an extension of the track to 3.9 kilometres (2.4 mi). It also saw the first 500 km race, named the Castrol 500. In 1989 the track reverted back to 3.1 kilometres (1.9 mi).

The 1990, 1993 and 1994 events had no major sponsor and were underwritten by Jon Davison.

Sandown held the Australian Grand Prix in 1964, 1968, 1972, 1973, 1976 and 1978

V8 Supercars

With the creation of the V8 Supercars series, they included the Sandown 500 event as part of their calendar until 1998. The race was then held as a sprint round until 2000, then as three 150 km races with pit stops in 2001 and 2002. The event was won by Todd Kelly in 2001 and by Marcos Ambrose in 2002. They returned to the 500 km format in 2003 with a sponsorship deal with Betta Electrical and have been a large part of the series since. The 2003 event was won by Mark Skaife and Todd Kelly for the Holden Racing Team. In 2004 it was won by Marcos Ambrose and Greg Ritter in a Pirtek-backed Stone Brothers Racing Falcon. In 2005, it was won by Craig Lowndes and Frenchman Yvan Muller in a Betta Electrical backed Falcon. In 2006, Ford Performance Racing got its maiden endurance victory with Mark Winterbottom and Jason Bright. In 2007, the major sponsor of the Sandown 500 is Just-Car Insurance and the event is called the Just Car Insurance 500, and was won by Craig Lowndes, his fourth victory, and Jamie Whincup.

For the 2008 season, the 500 kilometre endurance race has been moved to the Phillip Island. Sandown remains on the calendar, but will host a regular sprint race format. The 2008 event from 7th to 9th June was known as the Midas 400.

EasterNats

Easternats is a car festival held at the race track annually. It attracts a large number of entrants for the show’n'shine and various other events. It comprises usually a turn out of 750 entered vehicles.

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Queensland

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Queensland

Queensland

Queensland Raceway nicknamed “the paperclip” is a motor racing circuit located near Ipswich in Queensland, Australia.

The circuit plays host to V8 Supercars, the Australian Superbike Championship, Drifting, the Australian Motor Racing Series as well as club level racing and ride days.

Queensland Raceway is 3.12 kilometres (1.94 mi) long and 12 metres (39 ft) wide. Racing direction is clockwise. There are six corners. The circuit was designed by Tony Slattery with input from car and motorcycle racing authorities including CAMS circuit expert Professor Rod Troutbeck.

The circuit is licenced by Australian motorsport‘s two peak bodies, CAMS Limited and Motorcycling Australia, but generally sanctions its race meeting under the Australian Auto Sport Alliance. It runs its own championship series, the Queensland Racing Drivers Championship.

Spectator viewing at the track is excellent with the flat layout of the circuit and spectator mounds. However the flat layout makes racing less exciting for the competitors than undulating circuits like Phillip Island. The track is also very bumpy.

Queensland Raceway is located near the town of Willowbank, which is also home to the Willowbank Raceway drag strip, a Kart track and a short dirt circuit. The track is also located near RAAF Base Amberley and shares the base’s 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) noise exclusion zone.

There are also three Short Circuit variations of the track:

  • Sportsman 2.15 km (1.34 mi)
  • Clubman 2.11 km (1.31 mi)
  • Sprint 1.89 km (1.17 mi)
Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Phillip Island

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Phillips Island

Phillips Island

Old Track

The first races on Phillip Island took place in 1928 with the running of the 100 Miles Road Race, an event which has since become known as the first Australian Grand Prix. It used, as was traditional at the time, a high speed rectangle of local closed-off public roads with four identical right hand corners. The course length varied, with the car course approximately 6 miles per lap, to motorcycle racing of approx. 10 miles (16 km).

As speeds grew, there was a need for a safe circuit. The original Phillip Island road circuit, based around the airfield, was a dusty trek up and down hills and through tough tight corners. It survived from the late 1920s to 1935.

Current track

In 1951, a group of six local businessmen decided to build a new track. About 2 km away from the original circuit, it still bears the corner name signs of the original circuit. As the piece of available land was on the edge of the coast, the track is known for its steep grades – the highest 57metres – which caused cost overruns and delays in track opening. The new track hosted its first race in 1956, but after extensive damage from the 1962 Armstrong 500, the circuit could not afford repairs and the race moved to Bathurst.

The circuit reopened in 1966 but again, due to its testing terrain, the circuit required much maintenance and slowly declined through the 1970s. It was farmed by its owners while closed and was then sold in 1985 in preparation for reopening, but did not do so until 1989 after agreement on a long term lease and rebuild agreement. The World Motorcycle Championship gave the circuit a grand re-opening in 1989 with a brilliant race long dice in the 500 cc division between Wayne Gardner, Wayne Rainey, Christian Sarron and Kevin Magee. The race was won by Gardner to the delight of the huge crowd. It hosted its first World Superbike race in 1990. Mathew Close won the first race in 1990 by 11.31 sec. The Australian Touring Car Championship also returned in 1990 with Dick Johnson winning.

Current status

In 2006 and 2007, Phillip Island hosted the grand finale of the V8 Supercars Championship Series, as well as a regular MotoGP and Superbike round.

A multi-million dollar re-development was done late 2006, completed by the Linfox Group, who now own the track. The new facilities will also feature a karting circuit.

Future Formula One Grand Prix

Phillip Island was previously the host of the Australian Grand Prix from 1926 to 1936 and since the upgrades in the late 1980′s, there has been speculation that the circuit would host a race of the Formula One Championship. Recent discussions suggest that this could happen as soon as 2011 or sometime within that decade.[1] Director of the Philip Island Grand Prix Circuit, Andrew Fox, stated that they are interested in hosting a Formula One Grand Prix in the future. Although he admitted that there is a lot to be done to make the track suitable for Formula One racing, he stated that they are willing to make the investments for this. [2]

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Oran Park

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Oran Park

Oran Park

Oran Park Raceway is a motor racing circuit at Narellan in southwestern Sydney, Australia. Most of the circuit is visible from the main grandstand or the grassed banks surrounding the track.

Oran Park Raceway has several track layouts. It was established on 1 January 1963 with what was mostly like the current South Circuit. The first motorcycle race meeting was held on 17 February, with reigning Grand Prix Champion Jim Redman being the star attraction. Redman won nearly every class and set the lap record of 50.4 seconds, only 0.8 seconds slower than Frank Matich‘s outright time set in a 2.6 litre Lotus Sports Car.

The full track (“Grand Prix Circuit”) was added in the early 1970s. It is a 2.7 kilometre figure-eight shape with a bridge where the track crosses itself. Despite the loop in the longest track shape, the circuit is regarded as racing anticlockwise.

Oran Park also has a motocross track, a skidpan, a dirt track and four wheel drive course and is used for advanced driver training.

Oran Park was used regularly for rounds of championship series such as the Australian Touring Car Championship, V8 Supercar Championship, Australian Drivers’ Championship and Australian Sports Sedan Championship. The Australian Grand Prix was held at Oran Park in 1974 and 1977. In the 1970’s the circuit attracted large crowds for the popular Toby Lee Series (initially for Series Production cars, later for Sports Sedans).

Recently, the land on which the racetrack is on was sold to the NSW Government for a new housing development. This will lead to the closure of the track within the next two years.The owner is planning a replica circuit in close proximity to the current location.[citation needed]

Events hosted at the track include an annual round of the V8 Supercar series and has been host to the Superbike World Championship, and on two occasions the Australian Grand Prix.

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Bathurst

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Bathurst

Bathurst

Mount Panorama Circuit is a motor racing track located in Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia. It is the home of the Bathurst 1000 motor race, held each October. The track is 6.213 kilometres long, and is technically a street circuit, as the Mountain is home to a number of residents.

The track is a very unusual design by modern standards, with a 174 metre vertical difference between its highest and lowest points, and grades as steep as 1:6.13. From the start-finish line, the track can be viewed in three sections; the short pit straight and then a tight left turn into the long, steep Mountain straight; the tight, narrow section across the top of the mountain itself; and then the long, downhill section of Conrod Straight, with the very fast Chase and the turn back onto pit straight to complete the lap.

Historically, the racetrack has been used for a wide variety of racing categories, including everything from open-wheel racers to motorcycles. However, the factors that make the track so unusual, and tighter contemporary safety standards, make it unlikely that major race meetings in these categories will be held there again, and as such it has become the near-exclusive province of closed-bodied automobile racing cars.

As a public road, on non-race days Mount Panorama is open to the public. Cars can drive in both directions around the circuit for no charge. However, a strict speed limit of 60km/h is enforced, and police regularly patrol the circuit.

There are plans to create a new circuit using the bottom of the track to make it more suitable for motorcycle racing. Events NSW is in discussion with developers of the circuit. The possible track modifications will not affect the layout of the main circuit.

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Hidden Valley

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Hidden Valley

Hidden Valley

Hidden Valley Raceway is a motorsports complex 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) from Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. At the complex is a 14 turn race track which is 2.87 kilometres (1.78 mi) long, with a 1.1 kilometres (0.7 mi) main straight. The race track is used as the sixth round of the V8 Supercar series. The race track is known for its high speeds and fast lap times. The grounds of the racetrack also contain the dirt circuit Darwin Speedway.

At the complex there is also a 1 km drag strip which runs alongside the main straight of the race circuit.

V8 Supercar

The V8 Supercar series has been visiting Hidden Valley Raceway since 1998. The race is usually held late June or early July because the temperature is cooler and it is in the ‘dry season’. The current event is called the Skycity Triple Crown and was held on 4-6 July, 2008.

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Eastern Creek

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Eastern Creek

Eastern Creek

Built and owned by the New South Wales Government, Eastern Creek International Raceway is a motorsports circuit located in Eastern Creek (40 km west of Sydney CBD), New South Wales, Australia and is operated by the Australian Racing Drivers Club. Eastern Creek International Raceway is the only international race circuit in Sydney.

The raceway has recently been used for the A1 Grand Prix championship. The circuit has hosted rounds in 2005-06 A1 Grand Prix season, 2006-07 A1 Grand Prix season and the 2007-08 A1 Grand Prix season, but has been dropped for 2008-09 A1 Grand Prix season.

The track is fast and flowing and used for national Australian races for cars, bikes and superkarts. Eastern Creek formerly hosted the final round of the annual V8 Supercar championship. It was removed from the series calendar in 2005 but was recently reinstated to host a round of the 2007 series. [1]

From 1991 to 1996, Eastern Creek held the Australian round of the 500cc GP series (now Moto GP), losing it back to Phillip Island, the place it took it from. Eastern Creek is the hub of motorsport in New South Wales, also combining the world’s largest karting facility and Australia’s leading drag racing complex.

In the 1990s, Eastern Creek was the venue for a number of rock concerts and festivals including Guns N’ Roses, Bon Jovi, Pearl Jam, the Alternative Nation Festival in 1995 which featured Nine Inch Nails, Faith No More and Lou Reed as well as the Colossus 2 dance festival in 1997 which featured Italian group Cappella.

The facility offers motorsport fans and competitors a year-round motor racing facility includes a 4,000 seat covered grandstand over looking the start/finish line providing a view of 80 per cent of the circuit. The pit facilities provide 52 roll-in/roll-out garages, all with power and immediate access to the support paddock area.

However, on August 11, 2006, the Sydney Morning Herald reported that Ron Dickson, the A1GP circuit designer who also designed the Surfers Paradise Indy track, suggested that Eastern Creek is not up to today’s standard and need to spend money to upgrade.[2] On April 28, 2008, it was announced that Apex Circuit Design Ltd had been commissioned to perform a $350,000 feasibility study on upgrading the track to suit more purposes and hold larger events such as the Australian F1 Grand Prix. On July 11, 2008, wheelsmag.com.au reported that V8 Supercar boss Tony Cochrane ditched Eastern Creek and believes the new Homebush Street Circuit around the Sydney Olympic precinct is more suitable.

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Barbagallo

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Barbagallo

Barbagallo

Barbagallo Raceway is a motorsport circuit located in Wanneroo, approximately 50 kilometres (31 mi) north of Perth in Western Australia.

The circuit was originally known as Wanneroo Park and the first race meet took place in March, 1969. Initially the major race per year was a 6 hour Le Mans style race for sedans and sports cars known as the Six Hour Le Mans. However as interest dulled in that event, production car racing took over as the major race type.

In 1979, the Australian Grand Prix was held at Wanneroo Park which coincided with the opening of the new pits and paddock area to the west of the circuit. In 1992, it was decided that a short circuit would be constructed by linking Turn 5 on the current circuit to the back straight forming a new 1.7 kilometres (1.1 mi) long circuit. This extension was funded by Alf Barbagallo and hence the circuit name was changed to Barbagallo Raceway. The short circuit allowed for an increase in the types of racing including the inclusion of truck racing and also allowed events to be run at night.

The circuit was completely resurfaced in 2004 and this saw almost all lap records broken in the first few months of 2004. The surface changed from an abrasive surface which was renowned for being very hard on tyres to a grippy, smooth surface.

The track holds a number of major race meets each year, with the biggest being a round of the V8 Supercar championship. This is one of the biggest sporting events in Western Australia each year with over 50,000 people attending the 3 day event. However, in 24/07/2008, the V8 Supercar offcial website reported that the V8 Supercar contract for Barbagallo Raceway will ends next year and the Western Australian Government is investigating whether to upgrade the “dilapidated” circuit or build a new one. The site suggested that new track built or modifications to the existing circuit are needed or Australia’s most western state could lose a round of the Championship

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

Adelaide

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Adelaide

Adelaide

The Adelaide Street Circuit is a temporary race track in the East Parklands adjacent to the central business district of the city of Adelaide in South Australia.

The track has hosted eleven Formula One Australian Grand Prix events from 1985 to 1995 as well as an American Le Mans Series endurance race on New Year’s Eve in 2000 (The Race of a Thousand Years) on the long form (3.78 km) of the track. This was the first and only race of a nine year contract and the last race to be held on the long form of the circuit.

V8 Supercars

Since 1999, the track has hosted an annual V8 Supercar race called the Adelaide 500 (2x250km) on a shorter (3.22 km) variant of the track. Cars race clockwise around the circuit. Murray Walker went to the event in 2005 and called it ‘the best touring car event in the world’; he has been back every year since. In 2008 the event will be carbon neutral.

Uncategorized October 15th 2008

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